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Wright Aircraft engine manufacture

 
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rwahlgren



Joined: 15 Aug 2003
Posts: 156

PostPosted: Thu Aug 08, 2019 01:52    Post subject: Wright Aircraft engine manufacture Reply with quote

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sBfFpcdyd5Q


And take special note.

At 17:48 Crank Case sections assembled with nothing to seal them.

At 18:39 That dark assembly lube on the piston ring assembly's, what is it?

At 21:33 After initial run in, the engines are torn down and parts cleaned and
inspected, then reassembled, and run again. Talk about labor intensive.
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kmccutcheon



Joined: 13 Jul 2003
Posts: 214
Location: Huntsville, Alabama USA

PostPosted: Thu Aug 08, 2019 06:58    Post subject: Re: Wright Aircraft engine manufacture Reply with quote

rwahlgren wrote:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sBfFpcdyd5Q


This video has my favorite example of casting practice. We showed it a couple of times at AEHS conventions.

Quote:
At 17:48 Crank Case sections assembled with nothing to seal them.


That joint didn't leak much, but Wright engines had a reputation for leaking oil because there were numerous spots that didn't leak much...

Quote:
At 18:39 That dark assembly lube on the piston ring assembly's, what is it?


It is called make-up oil and consist of heavy, relatively unrefined straight mineral oil. It provides lubrication for the first few minutes of break-in but isn't so slick as to impede the slight metal-to-metal contact of high points on the rings and cylinder walls necessary for break-in.

Quote:
At 21:33 After initial run in, the engines are torn down and parts cleaned and
inspected, then reassembled, and run again. Talk about labor intensive.


After a time the process was refined so that only a statistical sample of engines were subjected to these "green runs".
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rwahlgren



Joined: 15 Aug 2003
Posts: 156

PostPosted: Wed Aug 14, 2019 14:36    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm pretty sure they had permatex aviation sealer back then, and could have been put on those crankcase surfaces, and prevented any possible chance of a leak.
Titeseal was used on Allison cases.

Is that unrefined mineral oil still available?
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admin02



Joined: 06 Aug 2003
Posts: 6

PostPosted: Wed Aug 14, 2019 15:56    Post subject: Reply with quote

You are correct about the Permatex, but you must realize that the Grand Canyon resulted from a Wright Aeronautical manager thinking he'd lost a quarter...
They COULD have used a sealant, but that would have cost money... Hence they didn't.

The unrefined mineral oil is still available and typically is shipped with refurbished cylinders.
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wlewis



Joined: 04 Feb 2006
Posts: 9
Location: culver city, ca

PostPosted: Sun Jan 05, 2020 22:25    Post subject: R-3350 crank case half sealing Reply with quote

If any had ever read / looked @ any of the Wright OH manuals!

oil used on build-up was 'castor oil' 'TiteSeal Lightweight' on the crankcase half sections on assembly!

Their would have been few sealants used in manufacture, why? engine going to be torn down after test cell 1st runs! Engine torn down /inspected than the sealants were used On engine surfaces when no TiteSeal one used silk thread as gasket in a 's' pattern on the surfaces. Lubriplate No. 130A on studs, etc.! Both the TiteSeal & Lubriplate, Permatex was purchased in 5lb cans in 'perishable' items listing.
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rwahlgren



Joined: 15 Aug 2003
Posts: 156

PostPosted: Wed Jan 08, 2020 21:57    Post subject: Reply with quote

I know on the small horizontal opposed general aviation engines they use the
string seal that you mentioned.
I don't know about the old days but more modern times the string is used in conjunction with a sealer, if for nothing else to hold it in place.
I don't think you will see that on a radial engine crankcase though. R-4360 has an oring material in a groove according to the manual.

What is Tite seal light? I've only seen one choice of consistency for it.
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