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Experimental and Odd-Ball Engines

 
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kmccutcheon



Joined: 13 Jul 2003
Posts: 196
Location: Huntsville, Alabama USA

PostPosted: Sat Sep 27, 2003 17:09    Post subject: Experimental and Odd-Ball Engines Reply with quote

I am interested in all engines, from steam to rocket, but my writings seem to have been mostly about WWII era piston engines. I am particularly interested in the experimental engine concepts that were tried in the 1920s and 1930s. This led to my book on the Wright Tornado, the first in a series about the experimental engines built for the US military prior to and during WWII. If you are interested the experimental aircraft engines of Continental, Chrysler, Ford, Lycoming, Pratt & Whitney, Studebaker, or Curtiss-Wright I would very much enjoy hearing from you. I would also enjoy discussing barrel engines and other such concepts that were outside the mainstream.
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Kimble D. McCutcheon
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szielinski



Joined: 13 Jul 2003
Posts: 96
Location: Canberra, Australia

PostPosted: Tue Dec 16, 2003 21:15    Post subject: Speaking of wobble-plates... Reply with quote

Check this out, can you suss how it works ??
http://www.mcmastermotor.com/
[link no longer valid, try http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harold_McMaster]
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kmccutcheon



Joined: 13 Jul 2003
Posts: 196
Location: Huntsville, Alabama USA

PostPosted: Tue Dec 16, 2003 22:08    Post subject: Reply with quote

Interesting! While I have not had time to explore it in detail, here iswhat appears to be the patent for it: US 6390052
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Kimble D. McCutcheon
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lmoretti



Joined: 13 Jul 2003
Posts: 14

PostPosted: Mon Dec 29, 2003 19:04    Post subject: McMaster Motor Reply with quote

There was an excellent presentation, with rapid prototype model of the engine which really made clear the concept, at the last American Helicopter Society Forum in Phoenix in summer 2003. I had to see it to believe it but it definitely is interesting. At the time they had not yet built an operating engine, just the plastic model. You should be able to get the paper from the Society at www.vtol.org.
Have fun,
Luigi
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gryan
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PostPosted: Sun Sep 12, 2004 20:28    Post subject: Unusual Engines Reply with quote

Kim

I too am interesed in unusal engines and spent a lot of time looking for information about barrel engines, nutating disc engines, rotary engines (Wankel and non-Wankel), vane motors, cat-and-mouse engines, swashplate engines and all the rotary valve engines as well. There are plenty of them!

Felix Wankel wrote an interesting text book where he attempted to categorise all the possibilities of rotary engine. He missed out an entire class of engine; intersecting axes machines. Even without these the number of possibilities is staggering. Surprising that in all these none seems to have made it. Most of these engines never saw the light of day for good technical reasons but a few look as if they deserved to succeed as they were well designed. I guess it was lack of funding (there have been some excellent articles in TM about this).

Do you have much information about rotary engines (non-Wankel)? In particlular I am trying to discover what became of the Mallory rotary engine. It was tested to 400 bhp but aside from that I know nothing of the story surrounding it. Does anyone know more?

Sleeve valve engines are impressive. This concept deserves to be utilised in cars as well as aircraft for the packaging advantages alone. It can also use lower quality fuels than can a conventional engine at similar compression. I recall hearing that Hewland (the gearbox manufacturer) tried to revive the concept. This was during the 1970s I think. Does anyone know about this? I'd like to find out more about it.

I don't know much about barrel engines but did come across some information about a nutating disc engine. It was called the Clarke Engine. Seemed to work OK.

Regards

Gerald Ryan
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fbarrett



Joined: 10 Sep 2007
Posts: 32
Location: Lakewood, Colorado

PostPosted: Mon Feb 09, 2009 19:27    Post subject: Reply with quote

ajones wrote:
During WWII a large number of captured aircraft and engines were evaluated by engineers in the US. Some of the Junkers diesel engines were inspected and tested in Columbus, Indiana, by Cummins. How would you go about finding out what was done with those engines? I heard this story from a now-deceased Cummins employee, so I can't verify it. Any ideas?


Several books exist on the Cummins business (try using Search on Amazon). In fact, C. Lyle Cummins Jr. lives in Oregon and has recently written two extensive history books on diesel engines. If you'd like to contact him, contact me.

Frank
fbarrett@aol.com
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