enginehistory.org Forum Index enginehistory.org
Aircraft Engine Historical Society Members' Bulletin Board
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

great engine reference book

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    enginehistory.org Forum Index -> Book, Mags, Films, Recordings, Reference
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
jgertler



Joined: 13 Jul 2003
Posts: 10

PostPosted: Sun Aug 17, 2003 10:14    Post subject: great engine reference book Reply with quote

C'mon guys, where are all the other posters? There must be at least a hundred of you that have interesting engine anecdotes and information that excited you when you discovered it...
When I think of the interesting books on old aero engines, one favorite that always comes to mind is a 216 page 1937 wirebound volume by James E. Thompson, called "Aviation Service and Maintenance." It has some 33 sections, most on a specific aero engine of the mid-to-late 1930's. What makes it unusual is that it focuses on many specific areas, features, components of each of those engines that need to be watched carefully as points of problems. And then it has "barnstormer" types of remedies and mechanical fixes to avoid these problems that are prevalent in the specific engine. It has always amused me to think of a present day FAA inspector presented with these low-tech cures and fixes.
One of my favorite examples is the observance that users of LeBlond 60 and 90 hp engines have trouble with loose cylinder base nuts"even when using heavy lock washers, and an ingeious method of eliminating this trouble to their satisfaction." The cylinder base gaskets are permanently removed and replaced by an "elastic rubber band...expanded by chemical action of the lubricating oil...and makes an oil tight Joint." There are hundreds of these notations and recommendations. kind of "folk mechanics." Great reading and a Must for anyone restoring or running these old engines.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
kmccutcheon



Joined: 13 Jul 2003
Posts: 197
Location: Huntsville, Alabama USA

PostPosted: Sun Aug 17, 2003 18:23    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Aviation Service and Maintenance

This is one I am unfamiliar with, but it sounds intriguing. Where would one find a copy? Your description reminds me of the “Air Service Handbook” and Victor Page’s “Modern Aviation Engines”.
_________________
Kimble D. McCutcheon
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
jgertler



Joined: 13 Jul 2003
Posts: 10

PostPosted: Sun Aug 17, 2003 20:23    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Kim; As a fellow owner of the best aero engine reference book ever pulished, the 1939 version of AEROSPHERE Smile , I can tell you this is an even more interesting book than the others you mention.
I have those, also, and they are Very good for specs and technical information. But the Thompson book specializes in pointing out common flaws and complaints for many specific engines and also clearly supplies many of the fixes that aircraft mechanics have come up with, through experience. As I said, kind of "folk mechanics." Many of the solutions to avoid breakages and keep engines running well, and special steps to take when overhauling, are very useful and practical. (ie. where to add some re-inforcement, extra screws, bolts hardware and how to add them and where etc). I did not yet look at abebooks.com, but I did note that there were three of these books for sale on the book search weebsite..www.BookFinder.com. But I must admit I was pretty surpised to see the high prices, form $100-$150 each.
I'd have to say that $100 seems a great value as it has more useful information than a stack of original aero engine manuals. I don't have any extra copies, msyelf. Good Hunting
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
wallan



Joined: 13 Jul 2003
Posts: 231
Location: UK

PostPosted: Mon Aug 18, 2003 01:25    Post subject: Reply with quote

There is one copy of this book on www.addall.com. Still expensive, though.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
hfriedman



Joined: 21 Jun 2004
Posts: 26

PostPosted: Tue Oct 04, 2005 13:42    Post subject: Reply with quote

There is a new reprint out: Beaumont, R.A.: Aeronautical Engineering: A Practical Guide for Everyone Connected with the Aircraft Industry.

Can anyone give a quick evaluation?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
pshort



Joined: 13 Jul 2003
Posts: 51
Location: Auckland, New Zealand

PostPosted: Sat Oct 08, 2005 05:32    Post subject: Reply with quote

My copy of "Aeronautical Engineering" arrived a couple of weeks ago, but I have been so busy I have hardly opened it.

It is a nice hardbound facsimile reprint done by Aviation Worldwide here in NZ. http://www.aviation-worldwide.com/

I am guessing it was originally produced in WW2, Beaumont was the editor, with chapters by various authors.

It is about 500 pages, most of it dealing with engines. For example, chapters on The Carburettor, Supercharging of Aero Engines, Types of Aero Engines and their construction, Overhaul of the Aero Engine, methods of Starting Aero Engines etc.
Also a few chapters on airscrews, landing gear, engine installation etc.

Lots of diagrams, on most pages in fact.

Many engines examined and explained in detail, not the sort of detail found in a manual (eg what shims go where etc), more explaining the design and how each part works. Merlin, Pegasus, Cheetah X etc examined.

The introduction explains that it was written to help those many new workers in the industry who had no way of seeing how all the bits they produced in isolation worked together. So it supposedly aims at those new to the industry and with limited mechanical knowledge, however as a gearhead-type, I can say it seems to have a very satisfactory level of technical detail.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
hfriedman



Joined: 21 Jun 2004
Posts: 26

PostPosted: Sat Oct 08, 2005 05:53    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for the information. Somehow the picture of the average dilution worker curling up with a 500 page book doesn't quite fit. Still there must have been a large number of supervisors and middle level executives who found the change daunting and even threatening. On Monday dong QC on the last run of prams and on Tuesday coaching the work force on exhaust valves. Nevil Shute wrote about the impact of dilution and he started with a company already in ailrcraft construction. With engines it must have been far worse. Somewhere I read that the detection of a hammer or a file in one's tool box in an assembly plant meant instant discharge.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    enginehistory.org Forum Index -> Book, Mags, Films, Recordings, Reference All times are GMT - 6 Hours
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group