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Sixteen cylinders

 
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gryan
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PostPosted: Sat Sep 03, 2005 04:30    Post subject: Sixteen cylinders Reply with quote

I am looking for information on 16-cylinder engines. In particular I am interested in methods of coupling a pair of 8-cylinder engines together to make a 16-cylinder unit.

Any assistance, advice, articleorof references gratefully accepted!
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jfairchild



Joined: 08 Oct 2003
Posts: 18

PostPosted: Sat Sep 03, 2005 10:52    Post subject: Reply with quote

Gerald.
The 1939 Aerosphere has the following in greater or lesser detail;
liquid-cooled;
7 v-types (ABC, Antoinette, Clement-Bayard, Dusenberg, Hispano, Peugeot, SPA)
+1 v-type diesel (Mercedes)
1 double v (Panhard, 1920), 4 rows at 45 degrees apart, 135 inc.
1 x-type (Clerget, 1920), 90 degree banks
2 double crank (Breguet, King-Bugatti)
1 horizontal opposed (Cuddon-Fletcher), 2-cycle
Air-cooled;
1 v-type (Miller)
4 x-types (Burgess, Fatava, Trebert, Viking)
2 h-types (Jalbert, Napier)
1 cam-type (Ferry)
1 Rotary type (Burlat)
1 Radial type (Maillet)
1 Barrel type (Franklin, 2 cycle)

There is a description, but sadly no drawing, of the 4 cylinder Maillet radial engine. A 16 cylinder, twin prop, version was also proposed following this principle: (Expect you're brighter than I, but I needed a pot of tea, pencil and paper to make sense of this one !)
"There are four cylinders arranged as a cross, and midway between their axes are placed the axes of the four independent crankshafts. In other words, the axes of these crankshafts form another cross which is staggered 45 degrees from the first mentioned, and they are all in a common transverse plane. In the inner of each crankshaft is a pinion meshing with a large bevel gear which is solid with the propeller-shaft. This results in a two to one reduction. Each piston is joined to two connecting rods whose opposite ends are joined likewise to the adjacent pistons. Midway on each rod is a journal bearing which hinges on the crank-pin of the shaft which lies between that particular pair of adjacent cylinders. This produces a sinusoidal motion to the pistons, which means that, in comparison with the normal engine, a longer combustion period and a short scavenge period are obtained."




On the King-Bugatti , there are 19 detailed pages in 'Textbook of Aero-Engines' by Sherbondy.
Despite all the effort that went into this engine, Hershel Smith states "Apparently, no example of Bugatti-King ever flew, although it performed well on the bench test".

Regards,
Jamie
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gryan
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PostPosted: Mon Sep 12, 2005 15:14    Post subject: V-16 info Reply with quote

Jamie

Thanks. Was the "Aerosphere' a magazine or annual? I've not heard of it previously.

Regards

Gerald
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jfairchild



Joined: 08 Oct 2003
Posts: 18

PostPosted: Mon Sep 12, 2005 17:40    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Aerosphere compendium was produced for 1939, 1941, 1942 and 1943 along the lines of 'Janes', and was edited by Glenn D. Angle (author of Airplane Engine Encyclopedia, 1921, head of aircraft engine design for the US Air Service).
The '39 edition is particularily useful as it, alone, includes all engines up to that year (the 1921 Encyclopedia brought 'up to date'), and with less censorship than the later editions. It is well illustrated, runs to 1500 pages, 850 on aero engines. The engine section is very thoroughly cross indexed, from which came the 16 cylinder list.
Someone really should republish it (Airplane Engine Encyclopedia is available on cd) preferably on paper and in several volumes. Original copies come up on e-bay, but usually go for $300-400, and are difficult to manhandle. Later editions make $75-100 but the engine sections may be only 120 pages. The compensation is the 'Aircraft Activity' manufacturer's list which, in the '43 edition runs to about 400 pages.
I believe an Aerosphere periodical was produced after WW2, but I've no idea if there is a connection.
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kmccutcheon



Joined: 13 Jul 2003
Posts: 194
Location: Huntsville, Alabama USA

PostPosted: Tue Sep 13, 2005 05:28    Post subject: Re: Sixteen cylinders Reply with quote

gryan wrote:
I am looking for information on 16-cylinder engines.

In addition to those already mentioned, there was the Chrysler IV-2220, a 16-cylinder 60-degree inverted V that was developed during WWII, after Aerosphere 1939 was published. US Patents covering the engine include 2359555, 2381745, 2393141, 2405424, 2468976 and 2498767.
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Kimble D. McCutcheon
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