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Greatest Aero Engine Ever

 
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kmccutcheon



Joined: 13 Jul 2003
Posts: 198
Location: Huntsville, Alabama USA

PostPosted: Thu Sep 30, 2004 08:33    Post subject: Greatest Aero Engine Ever Reply with quote

proe emailed a question that I could not resist placing before participants on the AEHS bulletin board:

Quote:
I got involved in quite a heated discussion the other day, with a couple of blokes about what was the greatest aero-engine ever built. They claimed that the Merlin had to be the greatest but I said that, whilst it was, indeed, a very good engine, Bristol and Napier turned out some incredibly good engines too. Nor must we forget that P&W, Wright, Allison, BMW, Daimler-Benz, Junkers, etc., etc., also contributed many fine engines.
What was the greatest aero-engine ever built, if there is such an animal? Is there one, and only one, engine that stands (cylinder) head and shoulders above all the rest?
Just what criteria would you use to decide what was in reality THE one? If it was complexity there are several contenders for that rosette with Napier’s Nomad being very high on the list along with P&W's R-4360. However complexity isn't necessarily a good thing, as it starts to interfere with efficiency, both work and down-time wise!!!!!

I realize that this might start a discussion with the potential of getting bogged-down, but it might also be a discussion that will provide some good "fun".
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rhavemann



Joined: 13 Jul 2003
Posts: 9
Location: carefree AZ.

PostPosted: Thu Sep 30, 2004 15:17    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Greatest Piston AC ever Built? OK! let me start it OFF....It was the
WRIGHT R-3350 TURBO compound..Why?? For air cooled engines ,Max power is limited by cooling fin area plus the E factor of the cylinder baffels this is how it made 3700 horse power take off. The cruise B.F.C. was the greatest thanks to the power recovery turbines ,with the help of fuel injection..
It was simple,big and tough.The W reduction gear was good to 4000 HP. The PW Wasp Major? Ask a North west Airline Mech. how simple a 4360was. Ever see a B-36 come home with out a prop feathered ? Not very often.Yes the 3350 took some time to get everthing resolved But many Connies made it across the north atlantic for years. and the Nam stories about the 3350 AD,s Are as good as the R-2800 stories.Why am I makeing The 3350 claim? Because the R3350 is Round.Big ,leaks oil ,makes smoke and I own two of them.They are a piece of history never to be repeated.
take it from an incurable ENGINE NUTT.
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Bob Havemann, The Wrenchmann
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kmccutcheon



Joined: 13 Jul 2003
Posts: 198
Location: Huntsville, Alabama USA

PostPosted: Sun Oct 03, 2004 10:06    Post subject: Reply with quote

Harry Keiner, a consulting archivist with United Technologies (Pratt & Whitney), produced the following list of “Thirty Most Significant Aircraft Engine” back in 1983:

1. Manly-Baltzer (1902)
2. Wright Brothers (1903)
3. Lavasseur Antoinette (1906)
4. Gnome (1909)
5. Anzani (1910)
6. Hispano-Suiza (1915)
7. Mercedes (1915)
8. Napier Lion (1918)
9. Curtiss D-12 (1922)
10. Wright J-5 (1925)
11. Pratt & Whitney Wasp (1925)
12. de Havilland Gypsy (1927)
13. Continental A-40 (1931)
14. Pratt & Whitney Double Wasp (1939)
15. Rolls-Royce Merlin (1940)
16. Bristol Hercules VI (1942)
17. Whittle W.1 (1941)
18. Junkers Jumo 004 (1944)
19. General Electric J47 (1947)
20. Roll-Royce Dart (1948)
21. Pratt & Whitney J57 (1953)
22. General Electric J79 (1958)
23. Pratt & Whitney J58 (1960)
24. Pratt & Whitney JT8D (1963)
25. Pratt & Whitney of Canada PT6 (1963)
26. General Electric TF39 (CF6) (1967)
27. Rolls-Royce (Bristol) Pegasus (1969)
28. Garrett TFE731 (1972)
29. Pratt & Whitney F100 (1973)
30. Rolls-Royce (Bristol) Olympus 593 (1975)
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szielinski



Joined: 13 Jul 2003
Posts: 96
Location: Canberra, Australia

PostPosted: Wed Oct 06, 2004 00:21    Post subject: Rephrase the question slightly ?? Reply with quote

How about the greatest reciprocating engine that ever FLEW ?
(That will rule out some of your favourite engines and mine, I know, Kim).

Obviously you are right about a long-winded discussion, but maybe a comparison matrix would be interesting to compile.

Something like:-
-power-to-weight ratio
-Weight of air consumed per hp developed
-Hp/unit displacement
-$ per hp developed (manufacturing only, not R&D)
-part count per cylinder
-length of operational service (in original air force/airline)
-TBO !
-plus all the usual maxima (output/cylinders/displacement/type/weight/etc)
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jschauer



Joined: 19 May 2004
Posts: 89
Location: Justin, Texas

PostPosted: Sun Oct 10, 2004 10:13    Post subject: Greatest engine Reply with quote

My choice would be the P&W 985/1340 series, it is still in common use, new parts are being made for it, it's a simple engine, and easy to work on... The largest, best radial, R-3350-26WD. The best small engine, C-65/75/85 by Continental.
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rhavemann



Joined: 13 Jul 2003
Posts: 9
Location: carefree AZ.

PostPosted: Sun Oct 10, 2004 11:26    Post subject: Loyal and dependable easy on the check book... Reply with quote

Laughing Right on! but let us not for get MANs BEST FRIEND ...
The C-145 ..O-300 I sat behind several of these benign creations
for 20 years . And subject them to all kinds of stupid abuse .but they all ways brought me back home. I even did my own major over haul.
( must have been simple engine) However the family has a closet member
stay away from a GO-300 ...its main diet was eating cylinders...
BY the way, I did not have to get a bank loan$$$ to pay the parts bill for the C major..This makes my wife a fan..also.What he world needs is a
repeat product, at a automobile price...
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ckuhns



Joined: 13 Jul 2003
Posts: 30

PostPosted: Sat Oct 23, 2004 18:18    Post subject: A great aircraft engine Reply with quote

I would like to nominate the family of small Continental flat four cylinder engines for this category. This would include the A-50 A-65 c-75 c-85 c-90 o-200 and the Io-240. Many people learned to fly behind an A-65 in the 1930s 40s and 50s. Many more people have learned to fly behind an o-200 since its introduction in the Cessna 150.I think your can go to about any general aviation airport in the US and find an airworthy O-200. I also beleive it is the fastest four cylinder engine in the world as the powerplant for Jon Sharp's NEMENIS.Rolls-Royce made the o-200 and put their name on the valve cover. Carl
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ljohnson
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PostPosted: Sun Dec 05, 2010 17:56    Post subject: Reply with quote

I agree....the most useful engines have been the horizontal opposed Continentals and Lycomings...More than any others they have brought flight to most.

Best sounding is perhaps a more interesting and equally subjective contest.

Nominate Griffon.....
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rwahlgren



Joined: 15 Aug 2003
Posts: 139

PostPosted: Fri Sep 20, 2013 19:59    Post subject: Reply with quote

R-2800 PW, and R-3350 TC should both get the vote. Main reason is they are still around and being used. Both have excellent records of service after they were refined. Low powered engines shouldn't be included, they never powered any major airframe in the big one nor are their TBO's anything special.
As far as the inlines (V12's) they always had and still do have very low
TBO's, I think its in the 600 to 800 hour range, where as the 2 I mentioned are much higher. Even the R-4360 had a higher TBO than the RR's do.
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klankenau



Joined: 15 Nov 2005
Posts: 41
Location: Dallas, Texas

PostPosted: Mon Sep 23, 2013 14:33    Post subject: Reply with quote

Prior to the Gnome, "dependable" would not be a term generally thought of when referring to an aero engine. It's simplicity and dependability revolutionized the scene just in time for the Great War, following which aircraft became commonly accepted. When viewed in the context of it's time, it was a leap of great magnitude, even though the basic technology eventually lost out to more "modern" or conventional design thought.
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