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Reverse on Constellation 3350

 
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gravery



Joined: 15 Oct 2004
Posts: 11
Location: Le Chesnay, France

PostPosted: Tue Jan 12, 2016 12:54    Post subject: Reverse on Constellation 3350 Reply with quote

I was told some years ago that emergency descent procedure on the Constellation implied using the reverse on the two inboard engines... Any expert or former Constellation crew member could confirm ?
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kmccutcheon



Joined: 13 Jul 2003
Posts: 194
Location: Huntsville, Alabama USA

PostPosted: Wed Jan 13, 2016 07:11    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have reviewed flight manuals for Lockheed 649, 749, 1049H, C-121C & G, and RC-121D. The latest of these (RC-121D) was publish in 1958. None make any mention of the technique you describe for rapid descents. All state that the most rapid descent rate is achieved in the clean configuration at Vne with superchargers in LOW setting, propellers at 2,600 rpm, and throttles closed.
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Kimble D. McCutcheon
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gravery



Joined: 15 Oct 2004
Posts: 11
Location: Le Chesnay, France

PostPosted: Wed Jan 13, 2016 07:45    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks Kimble.
I just got the flying report of an Air France L1049 in 1966. The A/C was back from overhaul and test flown (no passengers and only the needed fuel). They performed various tests at FL250 and the last one was an emergency descent to FL50. They don't indicate the descent rate but describe the procedure using reverse on both inboard engines, keeping power available on the other two (reverse to low pitch took 15 sec).
Airlines own procedures maybe ?
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kmccutcheon



Joined: 13 Jul 2003
Posts: 194
Location: Huntsville, Alabama USA

PostPosted: Wed Jan 13, 2016 08:46    Post subject: Reply with quote

Was it the descent from FL250 to FL50 that took 15 sec or the change to reverse pitch?

It is true that airlines developed their own procedures. Unfortunately, I do not have access to any airline manuals covering Constellation operations.
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Kimble D. McCutcheon
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gravery



Joined: 15 Oct 2004
Posts: 11
Location: Le Chesnay, France

PostPosted: Wed Jan 13, 2016 09:01    Post subject: Reply with quote

Switching from reverse to low pitch took 15 sec.
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rwahlgren



Joined: 15 Aug 2003
Posts: 134

PostPosted: Sat Jan 16, 2016 01:01    Post subject: Reply with quote

kmccutcheon wrote:
I have reviewed flight manuals for Lockheed 649, 749, 1049H, C-121C & G, and RC-121D. The latest of these (RC-121D) was publish in 1958. None make any mention of the technique you describe for rapid descents. All state that the most rapid descent rate is achieved in the clean configuration at Vne with superchargers in LOW setting, propellers at 2,600 rpm, and throttles closed.


I would think throttles closed and low supercharger would cause the prop to drive the engine, and cause reverse master rod loading.
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kmccutcheon



Joined: 13 Jul 2003
Posts: 194
Location: Huntsville, Alabama USA

PostPosted: Sat Jan 16, 2016 06:57    Post subject: Reply with quote

rwahlgren wrote:
I would think throttles closed and low supercharger would cause the prop to drive the engine, and cause reverse master rod loading.

It does, but that is a secondary consideration if one's airplane is on fire, has suffered an explosive decompression, or some other event that requires an emergency descent.
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Kimble D. McCutcheon
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akambic



Joined: 09 Feb 2014
Posts: 5
Location: Fairfax, Virginia

PostPosted: Thu Mar 10, 2016 12:15    Post subject: Reply with quote

Spoke with an old friend who has over 5000 hours on USAF Connie's from the late 1960s and early 1970s. He said he has never heard of this procedure. He stated that they never reversed props in flight.

He recalls hearing about DC-8s employing Reverse Idle on inboard engines for descents.

Tony
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