enginehistory.org Forum Index enginehistory.org
Aircraft Engine Historical Society Members' Bulletin Board
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

2010 Air races, any engine news?

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    enginehistory.org Forum Index -> Air Racing - General
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
rwahlgren



Joined: 15 Aug 2003
Posts: 139

PostPosted: Wed Sep 29, 2010 02:07    Post subject: 2010 Air races, any engine news? Reply with quote

How many corn cobs raced this year?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
wpearce



Joined: 08 Aug 2006
Posts: 37
Location: California, USA

PostPosted: Wed Sep 29, 2010 11:19    Post subject: Reply with quote

Only one 4360 and it was retired early when the oil pressure began to drop. It was in the Sanders' Seafury "Dreadnought".

The other Unlimited engine casualty (that I can recall) was Dan Martin's P-51 Ridge Runner. I believe it began making metal.

The only 3350 was in Rare Bear, which is a big change from a few years ago when over ten 3350 powered Seafurys would be in the hunt.

There were no catastrophic failures in the Unlimited but the Sunday race was cancelled due to high winds.

In the sport class.... there was much carnage. John Parker's Falconer V-12 powered Thunder Mustang "Blue Thunder" had a connecting rod fail and took out the rest of the engine.

Kevin Eldredge in his NXT "Reletnless" had a a runaway prop, most likely as a result of the oil filter housing breaking and the engine quickly loosing all pressure. The prop exploded off the aircraft making a sound one would never forget. Kevin brought her down safe. Video here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lkRbsHWa6Hk

Sadly, I can't remember who was flying the aircraft but the one and only GP-5 powered by a small block Chevy had engine trouble. I think they burned a piston and it never qualified. It was put on a trailer and headed home

In the race on Sunday, George Giboney in his Thunder Mustang lost power from his twin supercharged Flaconer V-12 and called a mayday. Very high winds made his difficult job of a dead stick landing impossible. George made the best of it but could not line up and hit the runway hard. He went off the side, cartwheeled twice with help of the wind. His airplane was destroyed but he walked away. Video: http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=e58_1285076147
Photos here (scroll down): http://www.aafo.com/hangartalk/showthread.php?t=8453&page=5

There were others that had engine issues and runaway props but nothing catastrophic that I am aware of.

Dan Whitney brought up the Allison 3420 from the Aerospace Museum at McClellan AFB in Sac for static display. There was also a Bristol Centaurus in a QEC on display that I believe was owned by Ellsworth Getchell who's Seafury is still powered by the Centaurus.

That's all I can think of.
_________________
Bill Pearce

www.oldmachinepress.com
www.bluethunderairracing.com
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
jarmstrong
Guest





PostPosted: Sun Feb 20, 2011 09:14    Post subject: Reply with quote

Not enough! Honestly I want to see Race #57 fly at Reno! I missed the years it was there. The canceled Gold race in 2010 was definitely a disappointment! I waited a whole year that?? Corncobs forever!
Back to top
wpearce



Joined: 08 Aug 2006
Posts: 37
Location: California, USA

PostPosted: Sun Feb 20, 2011 13:25    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sorry to say that I doubt you will see F2G race 57 at Reno. The aircraft was sold to Ron Pratte and he is not an air race guy, at least not yet.

But your R-4360 cravings should be fulfilled in 2011 with Dreadnought and Furias.

Also, in the next few years you may (emphasis on may) see the F2G race 74 at Reno. Bob Odegaard, the former restorer/owner of 57 is currently the restorer/owner of 74. Since he brought 57 to Reno why not bring 74 as well.

http://odegaardaviation.homestead.com/hanger.html

Now, in my (admittedly little) mind, if F2G race 74 were at Reno, how on earth could Ron Pratte not be talked into bring F2G race 57? Those two need to go around the course together... what a beautiful sight it would be.


_________________
Bill Pearce

www.oldmachinepress.com
www.bluethunderairracing.com
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
jarmstrong
Guest





PostPosted: Mon Feb 21, 2011 04:43    Post subject: Reply with quote

I had read that about Mr. Pratte. He's a car guy.
Hopefully Bob will be landing at Reno soon in race #74.
Although I read where #74 would be a static display??
At the "Corsairs Over Connecticut" Airshow last June, a gorgeous trailer mounted corn cob was run for the show by Connecticut Corsairs.
Back to top
rkammlott



Joined: 26 Jul 2004
Posts: 47
Location: Teaneck NJ

PostPosted: Mon Feb 21, 2011 12:02    Post subject: Reply with quote

he is a car guy but he DID buy the plane. so now he is both. i really want to see both together the way its ment to be.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
wpearce



Joined: 08 Aug 2006
Posts: 37
Location: California, USA

PostPosted: Mon Feb 21, 2011 15:20    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ron Pratte has purchased a number of aircraft. I believe in addition to the F2G he owns (or owned) a Spartan Executive, P-51 Mustang, Bearcat, Ford Tri-Motor, Eurocopter and probably more.

Walter Soplata, who passed away Nov. 2010 was the person who saved Race 74 from the smelter. He has saved, as best he could, many aircraft including 2 P-82s. It was his wish that his aircraft be preserved as museum pieces.

His son, Wally says "When persuaded by a local Cleveland-area museum to part with his F2G Corsair No. 74, he released the plane under the condition that it be put on display to commemorate Cleveland’s legendary air racing heritage. To Dad’s great chagrin, the museum has since sold the Corsair, and it is now being restored for flight."

In my previous post I said Bob Odegaard is the owner/restorer of Race 74. After giving it some thought I am not sure who owns the aircraft. I don't know if Odegaard bought it.
_________________
Bill Pearce

www.oldmachinepress.com
www.bluethunderairracing.com
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
fbarrett



Joined: 10 Sep 2007
Posts: 32
Location: Lakewood, Colorado

PostPosted: Mon Apr 18, 2011 22:27    Post subject: Reply with quote

I love old aircraft--and seeing them fly--but what is the justification for destroying such rare engines at Reno?

Frank
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
wpearce



Joined: 08 Aug 2006
Posts: 37
Location: California, USA

PostPosted: Tue Apr 19, 2011 13:02    Post subject: Reply with quote

fbarrett wrote:
I love old aircraft--and seeing them fly--but what is the justification for destroying such rare engines at Reno?

Frank


Hello Frank,

Certainly no Air Racer sets a goal of destroying an engine but it does happen. As far as justification for that loss, I believe it boils down to personal acceptance of the unintended consequence of racing. Some don’t accept that and refuse to have anything to do with air racing, while others do their best to minimize and manage the risk in an inherently risky sport.

Unlike the “Cash for Clunkers” program* of a couple years back, the air racer wants the engine to survive. After each race the screens are checked and any metal found is analyzed to determine its source. I have seen racers finish a good race only to have to stand-down because of metal in the screens. This typically limits the damage to a few replaceable parts. Also, most of the racers are not truly pushing the limits of their engines, so catastrophic failures are limited. And it is the catastrophic failure that destroys the engine.

I believe Stu Dawson’s Sea Fury, a gold racer, had the same 3350 for 13 years. And I think Howard Pardue, in his Sea Fury gold racer, had the same 3350 for 15 years. Both engines were overhauled, not destroyed while racing.

But yes, some engines are destroyed. The aircraft owner knows that the engine cost $150,000 or so and if they feel the risk of damaging that investment is outweighed by the experience of air racing, then they have justified for themselves that unintended consequence of losing an engine, but it is never a goal.

You say that you “love old aircraft and seeing them fly.” Some feel that “seeing them fly” is no justification for risking those old aircraft. I know we both disagree with them and for us, seeing those aircraft in their native habitat is worth the risk. Of course, every effort should be made to minimize the risk involved while accepting the inherent risk of flight. From what I have seen, air racers do the same thing to minimize the risk while accepting the inherent risk of racing.

Many people think there should be no air racing.
Many people think warbirds should be in museums.
Many people think it was pointless to go to the moon.

Regardless of what it is, some will see no justification. But those that do it look to understand and minimize the risk, and accept the experience as the reward. I think that is something that applies to all of us.

But that is just my opinion. Sorry for being so long winded.

*For those who are not familiar with "Cash for Clunkers", it was a US Government program which encouraged people to turn in their old "clunker" car for a big rebate to be used towards the purchase of a new car. After turning in their old car, all the fluids were drained out of the engine and about 2 quarts of sodium silicate solution was put in. The engine was run until it seized, destroying the engine and all parts, making salvage pointless. If you want to get people to trade in their old cars, fine... whatever. But why destroy a perfectly good engine for no reason? It just seems sadistic to me.
_________________
Bill Pearce

www.oldmachinepress.com
www.bluethunderairracing.com


Last edited by wpearce on Wed Apr 20, 2011 17:09; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
rkammlott



Joined: 26 Jul 2004
Posts: 47
Location: Teaneck NJ

PostPosted: Wed Apr 20, 2011 05:57    Post subject: Reply with quote

wouldnt you rather see these wonderful beasts at full throttle as they were intended to run or sitting on the ramp? Ill take the full power thank you. go to reno and youll understand.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
rwahlgren



Joined: 15 Aug 2003
Posts: 139

PostPosted: Mon Sep 17, 2012 12:01    Post subject: Reply with quote

fbarrett wrote:
I love old aircraft--and seeing them fly--but what is the justification for destroying such rare engines at Reno?

Frank


How many museums have destroyed rare engines?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    enginehistory.org Forum Index -> Air Racing - General All times are GMT - 6 Hours
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group